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The case for the Grumman F6F Hellcat being the greatest fighter of the Second World War

The case for the Grumman F6F Hellcat being the greatest fighter of the Second World War

Warplanes
The best fighter of the Second World War started life as an insurance policy. In late 1940 Grumman was asked to develop an upgrade of the F4-F Wildcat with a 1600hp Twin Cyclone engine as an interim measure due to ‘issues’ with Vought’s XF4U-1 that would require considerable work to resolve. Instead, Bob Hall proposed a new design using knowledge gained from talking to pilots who had fought in the Battle of Britain. This would become the F6F Hellcat, or Gannet if you’re in the niche of Fleet Air Arm pilots to fly it before the beginning of 1944 when sanity prevailed. The USN gave approval for work to start on 30 June 1941, the first prototype flew just under a year later with a 1600hp Wright Cyclone, the first aircraft equipped with a 2000hp Pratt & Whitney Double Wasp flew a mon...
Air Refueling – Inherently Dangerous, Made Less So Through Training

Air Refueling – Inherently Dangerous, Made Less So Through Training

Warplanes
Why Do We Do Air Refueling? Ever since flying began, the need for enhanced range of aircraft existed. In 1923, the first air refueling took place. The video above depicts a KC-135R refueling a NATO E-3 AWACs for training. The dangers of two aircraft flying in close proximity can not be understated. At 38 seconds into the video – within the next 2 – the aircraft were within inches of each other. While nearly every air refueling occurs without incident, the danger exists nonetheless each time two aircraft fly so closely to each other. Here is a short video with the history of Air Refueling. My Experience With Air Refueling as a KC-135 Pilot kc135e: The 2nd model with improved tf-33 engines producing 18,000 lbs thrust per engine and thrust reversers. (source: 190arw) KC135R: T...
Airpower 19 with his replica of the Tummelisa from the 20ies despite adverse weather conditions.

Airpower 19 with his replica of the Tummelisa from the 20ies despite adverse weather conditions.

Warplanes
First of all: I am posting this photo only because nobody has been harmed! Mikael Carlson flew a great demonstration at Airpower 19 with his replica of the Tummelisa from the 20ies despite adverse weather conditions. During landing his aircraft was caught by a gust of wind and hit a taxiway sign during taxiing out and rolled over in succession. The rescue chain was triggered immediately and worked perfectly! The pilot remained unhurt! Considerable material damage was caused to the plane. Day 26 "Emergency Services" @kjdphoto1971 Source